Category Archives: Interesting

This is stuff we find really interesting

Russian mystery hole explored

Russian mystery hole explored

Russians take time out from shooting down civilian planes to explore the mystery hole!

Russian scientists got their first look inside the mysterious crater in Yamal, Siberia on Wednesday, July 16, while the Siberian Times took a helicopter ride to get another look down into the hole.

Based off of the original video of the crater, it was estimated that the crater could have been up to 80 meters wide. However, Andrey Plekhanov of the State Scientific Centre of Arctic Research told The Siberian Times that the hole is about 30 meters wide and the outer portion that includes the soil emission is around 60 meters in diameter. The researchers were also able to get their first look at the icy lake that exists at the bottom of the 70-meters-deep hole. Soil, air, and water samples have been taken in order to help determine the cause.

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Another video in the read more

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Treasure found on 450 year old “Mars” war ship

Treasure found on 450 year old “Mars” war ship

July 7, 2014 – For 450 years, no one knew where the Swedish warship Mars, named for the Roman god of war, sank in the Baltic Sea. The largest vessel of its time went down in a fierce battle in 1564 with more than 800 people aboard. Its discovery in 2011 yielded an astonishingly well-preserved ship, including the seamen who went down with it.

Legend has it that the ship was cursed because its cannons were made using metal from melted-down church bells.

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Facebook publishes mind control research

Facebook publishes mind control research

A recent journal article titled ‘Experimental evidence of massive-scale emotional contagion through social networks’, authored in part by a member of Facebook’s Core Data Science Team, describes the results of secretly modifying the news feeds of 689,003 Facebook users to elicit different emotional states in those users.

In an experiment with people who use Facebook, we test whether emotional contagion occurs outside of in-person interaction between individuals by reducing the amount of emotional content in the News Feed. When positive expressions were reduced, people produced fewer positive posts and more negative posts; when negative expressions were reduced, the opposite pattern occurred. These results indicate that emotions expressed by others on Facebook influence our own emotions, constituting experimental evidence for massive-scale contagion via social networks. This work also suggests that, in contrast to prevailing assumptions, in-person interaction and nonverbal cues are not strictly necessary for emotional contagion, and that the observation of others’ positive experiences constitutes a positive experience for people.

This is how it begins.

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On Guard! The Story of SAGE (~1956)

On Guard! The Story of SAGE (~1956)

The development of the SAGE system cost more than the Manhattan Project (atomic bomb). It was an American air-defense system. The largest computer ever built. Used from the 1950s all the way into the 1980s.

The Semi-Automatic Ground Environment (SAGE) was a system of large computers and associated networking equipment that coordinated data from many radar sites and processed it to produce a single unified image of the airspace over a wide area. SAGE directed and controlled the NORAD response to a Soviet air attack, operating in this role from the late 1950s into the 1980s. Its enormous computers and huge displays remain a part of cold war lore, and a common prop in movies such asDr. Strangelove and Colossus.

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Caribbean space program

Caribbean space program

This is a description of a novel based in the Caribbean but the article includes some fascinating photos and information about the actual Caribbean space program (hint it wasn’t based on rockets)

It is, without doubt, the biggest gun I’ve ever seen.

I’m in Barbados doing research, and I’m standing under a 100 caliber barrel. The thing looks big enough to crawl into, but not quite. And the barrel just keeps going and going. Big enough that I have to trudge through the wet grass a ways to get some perspective on the whole thing. This cannon is so damn big it has a structure around the barrel to keep it rigid. It’s mounted on a concrete pad the size of an office building’s foundation. And there’s this huge space for recoil: a dark pit that I don’t want to fall down into, because it’s filled now with stagnant water.

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Wiki entry
MOAR
MOARER

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The IXS Enterprise

The IXS Enterprise

The idea of traveling to another star has captivated scientists and science fiction writers for decades, but the vast interstellar distances is a huge barrier to our star-trekking dreams. For interstellar travel to become a reality, we realistically need to develop a propulsion technology that can travel faster than the speed of light.

Now one NASA physicist has turned some very preliminary space-time warping experiments into a design of starship that would, quite frankly, make Captain Jean-Luc Picard drool.

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Crack Telstra Cabling Squad

Crack Telstra Cabling Squad

Some time ago, this Vulture South hack had a not-uncommon experience: loss of broadband during a storm.

It wasn’t water that killed things, but lightning: 130-plus metres of cable was scorched. The cable was direct-buried, meaning there was no convenient conduit through which a new cable could be dragged.

Telstra, to its credit, despatched a Crack Telstra Cabling SquadTM to perform the unenviable task of burying a new cable, unless an alternative could be found.

What follows documents the Crack Telstra Cabling SquadTM strategy.

 

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and this mob wanted to roll out high speed internet god help us

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Dolphins surfing in Esperance

Dolphins surfing in Esperance

It was a crystal clear day in Esperance when filmmaker David Riggs decided to send his quadcopter over the Southern Coast town’s beautiful beaches.

The air was still, the sky was cloudless and the ocean was like a turquoise millpond.

Riggs seized the opportunity on that still winter’s day to launch the device, which has four rotors powered by an electrical motor and fitted with a camera.

He was hoping to film sharks which may be following whales, which usually begin their migration along WA’s south coast this month.

The quadcopter camera captured captivating vision of bottlenose dolphins surfing at Observatory beach.

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The Worm Hole Machine

The Worm Hole Machine

Since the dawn of man, we have looked to the stars in awe and wonderment. Gazing into the heavens has inspired age-old questions like “Why am I here?”, “Are we alone?”, and “What’s it like to get sucked into a blackhole and travel at hypersonic speeds through a wormhole?” Well, with an Arduino, 120 LEDs, an infinity mirror, and some old-school NASA-inspired hardware, CLAW Amusement Technologies is at least pretending to have an answer to that nagging last one, if it were posed to a team of NASA engineers in 1960, with the Wormhole Actualization Machine (WAM).

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WHOAH

The severe weather season is off to a slow start in terms of tornadoes, hail, and wind reports.  Although, the number of storms has increased of late, and this increase will continue as the country sees warmer temperatures and higher humidities for the late spring and summer months.

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Don’t fuck with the Russians

Don’t fuck with the Russians

Are you among those frustrated Americans who have wondered how the Soviet Union’s only hostage crisis in Lebanon was resolved in just a month, while the plight of the six U.S. hostages held there continues to drag on without any

break in sight?

Well, according to the Jerusalem Post, the Soviets turned the trick by forgoing diplomacy in favor of a brutally more direct approach to the problem.

Simply put, they presented the kidnappers with chilling proof that terror can cut both ways. Literally!

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Read this. It’s fucken awesome.

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Sometimes cleaning toilets pays off

Sometimes cleaning toilets pays off

An honest janitor has cleaned up after finding $100,000 of dirty money in a toilet.

Chamindu Amarsinghe said on Thursday he was speechless to hear he will get $81,597 of the cash he found at Channel 9’s Docklands headquarters, after no one came forward to claim it.

The other $19,500 will go to the state, a magistrate ruled this week.

 

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The Warship that fired the first Shots of WWI

The Warship that fired the first Shots of WWI

BELGRADE – The river monitor Bodrog, the Austro-Hungarian navy ship that fired the first shots of World War I and a witness to the European conflicts of the 20th century under four different flags, now serves as a gravel barge in Serbia.

The Bodrog, a heavily armored vessel launched in 1904 and equipped with the most advanced naval technology of the time, shelled the Serbian capital just before midnight on July 28, 1914.

The ship’s 120 mm guns fired the first shots of a conflict that would last four years, leave millions of people dead and devastate Europe.

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This ship has been sunk twice and had a long history. Kind of sad it’s just wasting away.

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Nessie spotted in Google Earth?

Nessie spotted in Google Earth?

So large that it can be seen from space, it is enough to send shockwaves through even the most cynical Nessie sceptic.

This shadowy form measuring around 100ft long and seemingly with two giant flippers powering it through the waters of Loch Ness was photographed by a satellite.

For six months the image has been studied by experts at the Official Loch Ness Monster Fan Club, where excitement is mounting after various explanations for it were ruled out… leaving them to conclude it is ‘likely’ to be the elusive beast.

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Excursion of Doom: Parking…

Excursion of Doom: Parking…

Ok this is a short post. I have been parking here for years and it’s only recently that I have realised that no one else really knows about this place and how cool it is.

So what are we looking at here? Well, Sydney is literally riddled with old abandoned train and tram tunnels for lines that were never constructed or disused when Sydney got rid of its tram network. We have already visited the spectacular abandoned tunnels of St James station so I thought I would share another place where the tunnels are actually in use.

It is actually a Wilsons car park next to Wynard station and under the Menzies Hotel. This parking garage is a set of disused tram tunnels that have been convert into parking. Originally these tunnels were used for allowing commuters to jump off the tram to a train.

The entrance is off Wynard lane and the exit comes out right near the south side of the Sydney Harbour bridge. Here are some snaps I grabbed. Continue reading

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Mysterious Nazi rings

Mysterious Nazi rings

For more than 60 years these places, 170 kilometers to the North of Murmansk, were considered confidential. Nowadays a strict regime of access operates also.
These mysterious objects were built during World War II by the Germans. They are located near the village of Liinakhamari, in the Pechenga district, close to the Barents Sea. There are different stories about their purpose, one says that it is a platform for artillery guns, but they are aimed back from the Gulf, to where the Soviet warships could appear, another says that they are launching pads for the Wehrmacht’s unknown flying objects.

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Exploring absolute zero

Exploring absolute zero

Near the heart of Scotland lies a large morass known as Dullatur Bog. Water seeps from these moistened acres and coalesces into the headwaters of a river which meanders through the countryside for nearly 22 miles until its terminus in Glasgow. In the late 19th century this river adorned the landscape just outside of the laboratory of Sir William Thompson, renowned scientist and president of the Royal Society. The river must have made an impression on Thompson–when Queen Victoria granted him the title of Baron in 1892, he opted to adopt the river’s name as his own. Sir William Thompson was thenceforth known as Lord Kelvin.

Kelvin’s contributions to science were vast, but he is perhaps best known today for the temperature scale that bears his name. It is so named in honor of his discovery of the coldest possible temperature in our universe. Thompson had played a major role in developing the Laws of Thermodynamics, and in 1848 he used them to extrapolate that the coldest temperature any matter can become, regardless of the substance, is -273.15°C (-459.67°F). We now know this boundary as zero Kelvin.

Once this absolute zero temperature was decisively identified, prominent Victorian scientists commenced multiple independent efforts to build machines to explore this physical frontier. Their equipment was primitive, and the trappings were treacherous, but they pressed on nonetheless, dangers be damned. There was science to be done.

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Mont Blanc’s treasure

Mont Blanc’s treasure

It’s a plot line that wouldn’t be out of place in a Tintin comic – a French mayor, an Alpine climber, a historian, a wealthy Jewish stone merchant from London, and their tenuous connections to a bag of lost jewels discovered on the peak of Mont Blanc.

The trail begins early on 24 January 1966, as Air India Flight 101 starts its descent towards Geneva Airport. The pilot had miscalculated the aircraft’s altitude and the Boeing 707 was heading directly for the summit of Mont Blanc, France’s highest mountain.

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