Category Archives: Interesting

This is stuff we find really interesting

Excursion of Doom: Parking…

Excursion of Doom: Parking…

Ok this is a short post. I have been parking here for years and it’s only recently that I have realised that no one else really knows about this place and how cool it is.

So what are we looking at here? Well, Sydney is literally riddled with old abandoned train and tram tunnels for lines that were never constructed or disused when Sydney got rid of its tram network. We have already visited the spectacular abandoned tunnels of St James station so I thought I would share another place where the tunnels are actually in use.

It is actually a Wilsons car park next to Wynard station and under the Menzies Hotel. This parking garage is a set of disused tram tunnels that have been convert into parking. Originally these tunnels were used for allowing commuters to jump off the tram to a train.

The entrance is off Wynard lane and the exit comes out right near the south side of the Sydney Harbour bridge. Here are some snaps I grabbed. Continue reading

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Mysterious Nazi rings

Mysterious Nazi rings

For more than 60 years these places, 170 kilometers to the North of Murmansk, were considered confidential. Nowadays a strict regime of access operates also.
These mysterious objects were built during World War II by the Germans. They are located near the village of Liinakhamari, in the Pechenga district, close to the Barents Sea. There are different stories about their purpose, one says that it is a platform for artillery guns, but they are aimed back from the Gulf, to where the Soviet warships could appear, another says that they are launching pads for the Wehrmacht’s unknown flying objects.

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Exploring absolute zero

Exploring absolute zero

Near the heart of Scotland lies a large morass known as Dullatur Bog. Water seeps from these moistened acres and coalesces into the headwaters of a river which meanders through the countryside for nearly 22 miles until its terminus in Glasgow. In the late 19th century this river adorned the landscape just outside of the laboratory of Sir William Thompson, renowned scientist and president of the Royal Society. The river must have made an impression on Thompson–when Queen Victoria granted him the title of Baron in 1892, he opted to adopt the river’s name as his own. Sir William Thompson was thenceforth known as Lord Kelvin.

Kelvin’s contributions to science were vast, but he is perhaps best known today for the temperature scale that bears his name. It is so named in honor of his discovery of the coldest possible temperature in our universe. Thompson had played a major role in developing the Laws of Thermodynamics, and in 1848 he used them to extrapolate that the coldest temperature any matter can become, regardless of the substance, is -273.15°C (-459.67°F). We now know this boundary as zero Kelvin.

Once this absolute zero temperature was decisively identified, prominent Victorian scientists commenced multiple independent efforts to build machines to explore this physical frontier. Their equipment was primitive, and the trappings were treacherous, but they pressed on nonetheless, dangers be damned. There was science to be done.

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Mont Blanc’s treasure

Mont Blanc’s treasure

It’s a plot line that wouldn’t be out of place in a Tintin comic – a French mayor, an Alpine climber, a historian, a wealthy Jewish stone merchant from London, and their tenuous connections to a bag of lost jewels discovered on the peak of Mont Blanc.

The trail begins early on 24 January 1966, as Air India Flight 101 starts its descent towards Geneva Airport. The pilot had miscalculated the aircraft’s altitude and the Boeing 707 was heading directly for the summit of Mont Blanc, France’s highest mountain.

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Metorite almost hits skydiver

One summer day in 2012, Anders Helstrup and several other members of Oslo Parachute Club jumped from a small plane that had taken off from Østre Æra Airport in Hedmark.

Helstrup, wearing a wing suit and with two cameras fixed to his helmet, released his parachute. On the way down he realised something was happening.

“I got the feeling that there was something, but I didn’t register what was happening,” Helstrup explained to NRK.no.

Immediately after landing, he looked through the film from the jump, which clearly showed that something did happen.

Something that looks like a stone hurtles past Helstrup – clearing him by only a few metres.

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Animals fleeing Yellowstone park

Animals fleeing Yellowstone park

A number of bloggers are posting videos that show bison and other animals allegedly leaving Yellowstone National Park, prompting theories that as earthquakes ramp up the seismic activity will set off the Yellowstone supervolcano.

Two of the main bloggers behind the discussion stress that there’s no way to know when the supervolcano will go off but note that the 4.8 magnitude earthquake that hit on March 30 seemed to set off a reaction from the animals, who are moving for a reason.

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Video in the readmore. Continue reading

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The Pompeii Obsession

The Pompeii Obsession

Hey ZGeek, hoping for a shameless plug for my new site as I kinda need content and followers… including dicks drawn in dusty car windows… but here is a recent article from the site.

In a previous post, we mentioned that the ancients were utterly and totally obsessed with the penis, and while there are a tonne of ancient cave drawings depicting gigantic cocks, it doesn’t stop there.

One of the most famous sites around the world to contain artwork of such things is the ancient city of Pompeii, which was completely obliterated in 79AD when Mt Vesuvius erupted, like a geological version of a finale in any given porno, and covered the city in hot white… ash.

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Actual site: www.dicksindust.com
Faceberk: https://www.facebook.com/dicksindust

Appreciate it.

Cheers.

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In 1975 did the USA topple the Australian government?

In 1975 did the USA topple the Australian government?

Christopher Boyce, who was jailed for 25 years for leaking information about US spying and political destabilisation operations against the Whitlam Labor government in Australia during 1974 and 1975, was interviewed on Australian public broadcaster SBS’s “Dateline” program last month.

Boyce, now 61, confirmed his previous statements that the CIA—aided by agents inside the Australian labour and trade union movement—was centrally involved in the 1975 “Canberra Coup” that ousted the Labor government.

Boyce, who was just 22 when he began to expose the CIA’s operations, expressed admiration for today’s generation of whistleblowers, Julian Assange, Bradley Manning and Edward Snowden. He warned Snowden that the American government would never stop in its efforts to capture him and “do to him exactly what they did to me.”

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“Allies”

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Get your Nerd on…

Get your Nerd on…

The International Space Station (ISS) is a habitable satellite that was launched on October 31 2000 and has had continued human occupation ever since, the longest on record. It’s an observatory and research laboratory in low Earth orbit with crew conducting experiments in Biology, Physics and Astronomy, amongst other things. The station orbits the Earth every 90 minutes, and in 2010 it had racked up almost 60,000 orbits, accruing a whopping 1.5 billion miles. To give you an idea of its size, in total it’s about the area of a U.S. football field, and weighs over 400,000 kilograms. You can see the ISS without a telescope; the best time is the few hours after sunset or before sunrise.

If you want to take a look at what it’s doing and have a sneaky peek at the crew whilst they’re on duty, check out the live ISS stream here!
If the stream displays a black/blue screen, there has been a temporary loss of signal. Check back later.

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The dead do not rot in Chernobyl

The dead do not rot in Chernobyl

Like a landscape of the undead, the woods outside Chernobyl are having trouble decomposing. The catastrophic meltdown and ensuing radiation blast of April 1986 has had long-term effects on the very soil and ground cover of the forested region, essentially leaving the dead trees and leaf litter unable to decompose. The result is a forest full of “petrified-looking pine trees” that no longer seem capable of rotting.

Indeed, Smithsonian reports, “decomposers — organisms such as microbes, fungi and some types of insects that drive the process of decay — have also suffered from the contamination. These creatures are responsible for an essential component of any ecosystem: recycling organic matter back into the soil.”

All of that now has been slowed way down, as explored in a new study led by University of South Carolina biologist Timothy Mousseau, just published in Oecologica.

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Bear eats plane. Duct tape rebuilds plane

Bear eats plane. Duct tape rebuilds plane

While tied down for several days, the aircraft was attacked and partially eaten by an Alaskan brown bear. Damage was reported to the fusalage, horizontal stablizer, landing gear, and windows of the aircraft. No human casualties were reported. The bear escaped but presumably suffered some gastrointestinal difficulties as it defecated several times in the area. Extensive field maintainence and temporary repairs were carried out on the aircraft and it was flown to Anchorage for repairs.

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Image source

Check out the pictures in the read more.

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The rise of the Bronies

The rise of the Bronies

On the internet, no one knows you’re a pony. At least, they don’t have to.

When the largely male, largely adult contingent of My Little Pony Friendship Is Magic fans now known as “bronies” emerged shortly after the show’s premiere three years ago, they were a largely disorganized, largely anonymous band haunting places like 4chan’s /co/ and /b/ boardsThey got trolled. A lot.

And to be honest, it’s amazing that such a fandom even formed, let alone blossomed. When I first wrote about bronies in early 2011, most people considered them a random fad, a meme that would vanish faster than planking. But the phenomenon didn’t just persist—it thrived.

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Moon impact caught on video

On Sept. 11, 2013, an asteroid hit the Moon. That happens all the time, but most of the cosmic debris is tiny, far too small to detect from the Earth.

But this one was different. Roughly a meter across and moving at interplanetary speeds when it slammed into the lunar surface, it created the brightest explosion ever seen on the Moon! The whole thing was captured on video.

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Hitler’s gift to Prince Edward wound up in New Zealand?

Hitler’s gift to Prince Edward wound up in New Zealand?

A mysterious vintage car bought for £500 and restored at Southward Car Museum could be worth more than $12 million, and has a shadowy tale to accompany it.

The 1938 540K Mercedes Benz will be fired up publicly for the first time since its restoration, at the museum’s Open House event on March 2.

Southward promotions and events manager Hayden Beissel said a representative from the Paraparaumu museum bought the car in 1968 in England for £500.

Any 1938 540K is rare, but this one especially so. It was built in Germany during Nazi rule, but was right hand drive, while German cars were left hand drive.

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The Ural (SSV-33) command ship

The Ural (SSV-33) command ship

Designed to act as the eyes and ears of the Soviet Pacific Fleet, this massive command ship was among Russia’s most ambitious Cold War constructs. Packing cutting edge electronic warfare and communications systems, this enormous ship could have become the monolithic centrepiece of Russia’s navy. So why did it end up rotting away as off-shore barracks instead?

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Twelve of the weirdest cars built in Australia

Twelve of the weirdest cars built in Australia

With all the recent news about local car manufacturing, you could be forgiven for thinking Australia has only ever built Fords, Holdens and Toyotas. But in fact, we’ve got a long, varied – and often quite weird – car building history.

From a bugeyed oddity spawned by a company who honed their skills on washing machines and cement mixers, to a car co-designed by a motoring journalist, there are a host of strange vehicles lurking in our past. Here are some of the best…

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I think the Leyland P76 should be on there too. None the less, this is a bloody awesome list. Most of the cars I have never heard of. I can’t believe the car above is not a Holden. But re-branded to a Mazda with the option of a rotary engine!

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Sinkhole swallows Corvette museum

Sinkhole swallows Corvette museum

A 40-foot sinkhole opened up under the National Corvette Museum in Kentucky and swallowed eight collector cars, including the historic 1992 White 1 Millionth Corvette, the museum said on Wednesday.

No injuries were reported, but a 1993 ZR-1 Spyder and a 2009 ZR1 “Blue Devil” on loan from General Motors Co were among the iconic cars piled up in the gaping pit.

“It seems almost Biblical in a way, to have the ground open up and swallow the cream of the collection of the museum,” said Corvette historian Jerry Burton. “What are the odds?”

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Video of the cars falling in, plus drone footage of the current state of the cars in the read more! Continue reading

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